Historic Sites

Caister Castle

Caister Roman (Saxon Shore) Fort

Caistor St Edmund (Venta Icenorum)

Cow Tower (River Wensum Norwich)

Great Yarmouth North West Tower

Great Yarmouth Row Houses and Greyfriars’ Cloisters

Holy Trinity Church, Loddon

St Benets Abbey

St Helen’s Church, Ranworth

St Olave’s Priory

Somerleyton Hall

Waxham Great Barn

 

 

Burgh Castle

Burgh Castle

The impressive Roman fort at Burgh Castle, near Great Yarmouth, close to the River Waveney and overlooking the Halvergate Marshes. The walls of the fort are in the care of English Heritage, but the Trust owns the fort, most of the surrounding farmland and an adjacent area of reed beds, which are full of interesting bird life. The property in all covers 90 acres (37 hectares).

Caister Castle

Caister Castle

Caister Castle was built in 1432 by Sir John Fastolf. The 90 foot tower remains intact and visitors can climb to the top for a magnificent view of the castle ruins and the surrounding area. The castle is of historical interest both because it is one of earliest buildings in England of importance to be built of brick and because of its connection with Fastolf and later the Paston family.The Castle is currently home to the largest private collection of motor vehicles in Britain which is housed in a purpose built museum and includes many fine and rare veteran, vintage, classic, sports and touring automobiles and motorcycles.

Caister Roman ‘Saxon Shore fort’

Caister Roman Fort

The partial excavated remains of a Roman ‘Saxon Shore’ fort, including wall and ditch sections and building foundations. Built around AD 200 for a unit of the Roman army and navy and occupied until the end of the 4th century.

Caistor St Edmund (Venta Icenorum)

Caistor St Edmond

The Roman capital of East Anglia, or more precisely the capital of the area of the Iceni tribe led by the famous Queen Boudicca. After her rebellion was over, the Romans laid out the foundations of their new regional capital in a bend of the River Tas and called it Venta Icenorum – “the market place of the Iceni”.

Cow Tower (River Wensum Norwich)

Cow Tower

One of the earliest purpose-built artillery blockhouses in England, Cow Tower was built in 1398-9 to control a strategic point in Norwich’s city defences.

 

Gt Yarmouth North-west Tower.

Yarmouth History

A Medieval tower on the North Quay, Gt Yarmouth, built in 1344 as part of the town walls. An interesting link for this part of the town can be found here.

 

Great Yarmouth Row Houses and Greyfriars’ Cloisters

Row Houses

The delightful Row Houses at Row 111 and the Old Merchant’s House are rare remnants of Great Yarmouth’s original distinctive ‘Rows’ which were a network of narrow alleyways linking Yarmouth’s three main thoroughfares

 

Holy Trinity Church, Loddon

Broads Churches

Dates from 1490, with a hammer beam roof, and a panel on the rood screen depicting William of Norwich, a boy martyr said to have been crucified by Jews in the 12th century.

 

St Benets Abbey

St Benets Abbey

The Abbey of St Benets lies on a sand and gravel island called Cow Holm surrounded by grazingmarshes beside the River Bure.  The site was enclosed by a wall with battlements in 1327. It was the only religious house in England not actually dissolved by Henry VIII.  The Bishops of Norwich have remained Abbots to the present time. The Bishop/Abbot arrives by wherry and preaches at the annual service on the first Sunday during August. In 1987, a cross of oak from the Royal Estate at Sandringham was erected on the site of the High Altar.

 

 

St Helen’s Church, Ranworth

Broads Churches

Dates from 1370, and has an outstanding painted rood screen. There is a wonderful antiphoner book of 285 sheepskin pages with versicles and responses for the seven services for every day of the year, produced by monks of Langley Abbey and given to the church in 1748. Splendid views of broadland can be seen from the top of the 96 ft (29 m) high tower.

 

St Olave’s Priory

St Olave’s Priory

The hidden gem in this unassuming ruin is its 14th century refectory undercroft. Its vaulted brick ceiling is an important early example of the use of brick in England. Supported on Purbeck marble columns, it is still almost complete and retains much of its original plasterwork.

 

Somerleyton Hall

Somerleyton

Somerleyton Hall is widely regarded as one of the best examples of an archetypal Tudor-Jacobean mansion and one of the most beautiful stately homes in Britain whose rooms and gardens are open to the public.

Waxham Great Barn

Waxham Barn was built in the last quarter of the 16th Century and was repaired and restored by Norfolk County Council during the early 1990s. The later single storey wings (shelter sheds for cattle) were repaired and one was converted to a cafe Funding came mainly from The Heritage Lottery Fund and East of England